Tomato and Cucumber Salad

We love this tomato and cucumber salad because it’s light and refreshing, perfect for barbeques and picnics! Pick up a few tomato plants from Back Home on the Farm and use your tomatoes for this delicious side dish. 

You’ll need:

For the salad:

  • 5 large tomatoes, quartered
  • 1 English cucumber, peeled and sliced
  • 1/2 large red onion, sliced
  • tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 pinch kosher salt and 1 pinch black pepper

For the dressing:

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • teaspoon kosher salt + 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey or brown sugar (optional for low-carb, Keto, or sugar-free diets)
  • teaspoon dried oregano

To make: 

Combine all the vegetables, herbs, salt, and pepper in a salad bowl.

In another bowl, combine all the dressing ingredients. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss to combine. Refrigerate and serve when ready. 

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Herb-Marinated Steak

Herb marinades are a game-changer for steak lovers! Infusing steak with a blend of fragrant herbs adds a rich depth of flavor. The marinade’s acidity helps tenderize the steak, making it juicy and succulent. Pick up a variety of fresh herbs here at Back Home on the Farm. 

You’ll need:

  • 1 cup fresh basil
  • 3 scallions thinly sliced
  • tablespoons fresh thyme
  • tablespoons fresh mint
  • cloves garlic
  • jalapeno seeded and sliced
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • lemon lemon zest
  • ½ lemon lemon juice
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2½ lbs steaks

To make: 

Combine all ingredients except the steaks and place them in a food processor, then pulse until a paste forms.

Pat the meat dry and place it in a shallow baking dish or a freezer bag. Cover the meat with the marinade and refrigerate it for at least 30 minutes or overnight.

When ready to cook, heat the grill to high. Use a paper towel to pat the meat dry, leaving on as much paste as possible. Grill over direct heat or under the broiler until browned on both sides, about 3-6 minutes per side if 1 to 11/4 inches thick and 6-9 minutes if 2 inches thick. Let rest for 5-10 minutes.

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Mini Spinach and Egg Frittatas

We love quick, nutritious breakfasts that we can grab before we begin our busy days here at Back Home on the Farm. These Spinach and Parmesan Egg Muffins are delicious and packed with protein and veggies to kickstart your day. They’re also a perfect way to use all that spinach you grew in your garden. 

You’ll need:

  • 4 large eggs
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 1/2 cup 2% milk
  • 4 cups fresh spinach (roughly chopped if putting in muffin tins)
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika

To make:

  1. Preparation: Start by preheating your oven to 450 degrees. This high temperature ensures your muffins get that golden-brown top. While waiting for the oven to heat up, generously spray a muffin tin with vegetable oil spray to prevent sticking.
  2. Mix Ingredients: Whisk the eggs and egg whites in a large bowl. Add the milk, chopped spinach, grated Parmesan cheese, and the seasonings (salt, pepper, and a dash of paprika). Whisk all the ingredients until well combined. 
  3. Bake: Pour the egg mixture into the muffin tins, filling them about 2/3 of the way. Slide the tray into the oven and bake for 15-18 minutes. You’ll know they’re done when they are firm to the touch and golden brown on top.

Serving Suggestions:

These egg muffins can be served warm right out of the oven or stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. Reheat them in the microwave for a quick breakfast. They’re also perfect for a protein-packed snack after a workout. Pair them with a small salad or fruit for a balanced meal.

Serve and enjoy!

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Healthy Spinach Harvest

With its vibrant green leaves and nutrient-packed goodness, spinach is a favorite among gardeners and culinary enthusiasts. Growing spinach in your garden ensures a fresh and abundant supply of this versatile leafy green and offers numerous health benefits and culinary possibilities. Here’s everything you need to know to grow spinach successfully in your backyard.

Spinach has various varieties with unique flavors, textures, and growing preferences. Varieties offered at Back Home on the Farm include Lizard Leaf, Imperial Valley, Smooth Leaf, and Bloomsdale. Consider factors such as your climate, available space, and culinary preferences when selecting a variety for your garden.

Spinach thrives in cool weather, making it an excellent choice for early spring and fall gardens. It prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, especially in warmer climates. Ensure your soil is well-drained, fertile, and rich in organic matter. Aim for a soil pH between 6.0 and 7.0 for optimal growth.

Spinach can be grown from seeds or transplants depending on your preference and growing season. For a continuous harvest, sow seeds every few weeks throughout the growing season. Plant seeds ½ to 1 inch deep and space them according to the variety’s recommendations. Keep the soil consistently moist until the seeds germinate.

Spinach requires regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Mulch around the base of the plants to retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Fertilize spinach plants with a balanced fertilizer every 4-6 weeks to promote healthy growth.

Additionally, monitor your plants for pests such as aphids, flea beetles, and leaf miners. Handpick any pests or use organic insecticidal soap to keep them under control. Harvesting Spinach Harvest spinach leaves when they reach your desired size, typically 4-6 inches long for baby spinach and 6-8 inches for mature leaves. Use a sharp knife or scissors to cut the leaves just above the soil level.

Harvest outer leaves first, allowing the inner leaves to grow for future harvests. Enjoying Your Spinach Harvest Once harvested, spinach can be enjoyed in various culinary creations. Use it raw in salads, sandwiches, and wraps, or cook it by steaming, sautéing, or wilting. Spinach is versatile in soups, stews, quiches, and pasta dishes.

Thriving Greens

With its crisp texture and refreshing taste, lettuce is a staple worldwide in salads, sandwiches, and wraps. Growing your lettuce at home not only ensures a constant supply of fresh greens but also allows you to explore a variety of flavors and textures. Below we’ll walk you through everything you need to know to grow lettuce successfully in your garden.

Lettuce has several varieties with unique flavor, texture, and growing preferences. Back Home on the Farm carries the following lettuce varieties: Cheap Frills Lettuce, Buttercrunch, Fresh Heart, Allstar, and Bonvivant. Consider factors such as your climate, available space, and taste preferences when selecting a variety for your garden.

Lettuce thrives in cool weather, making it an excellent choice for spring and fall gardens. It prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, especially in hotter climates. Ensure your soil is well-drained, fertile, and rich in organic matter. Aim for a soil pH between 6.0 and 7.0 for optimal growth.

Lettuce can be grown from seeds or transplants, depending on your preference and growing season. For a continuous harvest, sow seeds every few weeks throughout the growing season. Plant seeds ¼ to ½ inch deep and space them according to the variety’s recommendations. Keep the soil consistently moist until the seeds germinate.

Lettuce requires regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Avoid overhead watering to prevent the development of fungal diseases. Mulch around the base of the plants to retain soil moisture and suppress weeds.

Fertilize lettuce plants with a balanced fertilizer every 3-4 weeks to promote healthy growth. Monitor your plants for pests such as aphids, slugs, and snails. Handpick any pests or use organic insecticidal soap to keep them under control.

Harvest lettuce leaves when they reach your desired size, typically 4-6 inches long for leaf lettuce and 6-8 inches tall for head lettuce varieties. Use a sharp knife or scissors to cut the leaves just above the soil level. Harvest outer leaves first, allowing the inner leaves to grow for future harvests.

Once harvested, lettuce can be enjoyed in a variety of culinary creations. Use it as a base for salads, sandwiches, wraps, and tacos, or incorporate it into soups, stir-fries, and smoothies. Lettuce is also versatile in appetizers, side dishes, and even desserts.

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